Spider Legs

I found a great game at SunnyDaysBlog.com called Spider Legs.

Each player draws a circle on their paper. That is your spider’s body.

Each player takes turns rolling 4 dice.

If you can make a number sentence that equals 8 with your dice, add a leg to your      spider.

You have to use at least 2 of your dice but you can use as many as all 4.

The first player to make a spider with 8 legs is the winner!

There are many ways you can adapt this game.
For students who are learning to recognize the regular dot patterns – 
Each player draws a circle on their paper and chooses a numeral, 1-6, to write in the circle.  Each player takes turns rolling 1 die.  If the dot pattern matches the number written in the circle, you can add one leg to your spider.  The first person to make a spider with 8 legs is the winner.
For students who are learning to structure to 5 – 
Each player draws a circle on their paper.  Each player takes turns rolling 2 special dice.  Each of the die should have the numerals 0 – 5 written on it.  (You can make the dice using blank wooden cubes or putting tape over dice you have.)   If the numbers rolled add up to 5, you can add one leg to your spider.  The first person to make a spider with 8 legs is the winner.  You might need to have 5-frames available to support some students.
For students who are learning 5+ facts – 
Each player draws a circle on their paper and chooses a numeral 5-10 to write in the circle .  Each player takes turns rolling 2 special dice.  One of the die should have the numeral 5 written on all 6 sides and the other die should have  0 – 5 written on it.  (You can make the dice using blank wooden cubes or putting tape over dice you have.)   If the numbers rolled add up to the number written in the circle, you can add one leg to your spider.  The first person to make a spider with 8 legs is the winner.  You might need to have 5+, 10-frames available to support some students.
For students who are learning doubles – 
Each player draws a circle on their paper and chooses a numeral (2, 4, 6, 8, 10) to write in the circle .  Each player takes turns rolling a die.     If the number rolled can be doubled to equal number written in the circle, you can add one leg to your spider.  The first person to make a spider with 8 legs is the winner.  You might need to have  pair wise, 10-frames available to support some students.
How will you adapt this game for students?  Please send your ideas!

Multiplication

Here are two websites for students who are developing multiplication skills.

The first is a tool for students to practice skip counting  http://www.topmarks.co.uk/flash.aspx?f=countingstickv4

I like to use the horizontal stick, then select “steps of constant size” and “count on – from zero.” You can use the buttons at the bottom of the page to adjust the step size.  Start with all the doors open and have students say the sequence forward and backward.  Then, close doors one at a time as students continue to practice the sequence forward and backward.

 

The second site helps students see how arrays relate to multiplication problems.

http://www.hbschool.com/activity/space_arrays/

Students determine the number of rows, how many in each row, and finally the answer to the multiplication problem.

Dice Games

Last Friday I did a session for paraprofessionals on using Dice Games.  The participants received a handout with rules for a variety of games using dice and they had a chance to play many of the games.  I’m attaching a copy of the handout they received.  There are games for a variety of learning needs.

dice

Money

Sorry, I don’t have any money to share, but I do have a money activity to share.  This website http://illuminations.nctm.org/activitydetail.aspx?id=217 has lots of different activities and it uses a great visual model for students to understand money.
After you select the activity you want, you will see a box like this in the lower right hand corner –

Screen shot 2013-10-07 at 9.46.07 AM

click on it and your screen will look like this-

Screen shot 2013-10-07 at 9.43.11 AM

Then you can move the pieces to the chart like this-

Screen shot 2013-10-07 at 9.52.21 AM

If they need to, students can count the boxes to see how much the coins are worth.

There are activities for Counting Coins, Collecting Coins, Exchanging Coins, Making Change, and Receiving Change.  You can also use it for sorting coins.  This will be great if you have a projector, SmartBoard, or student computers.

A Dice Game

Here’s a dice game from an article I read recently (“Developing Quantitative Mental Imagery,” Thomas, Jonathan N.; Tabor, Pamela D. in Teaching Children Mathematics).
 
Each child gets a single, six-sided, dot die, or you can pass one die from child to child.  The teacher rolls two dice, says the total and then covers the dice.  Each child rolls their die and says the sum of their die plus the teacher’s dice.  The student with the largest sum wins the round.
 
Have students share their strategies – are they counting by 1’s, using doubles, making 10, using known facts…?
 
Easier?
  • The teacher just rolls one die
  • The student die just has 1, 2, or 3 dots on it
More Challenging?
  • The teacher rolls 3 dice
  • The students roll a numeral die instead of a dot die